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to the system do you think are required? how deep? >> please understand that current law, the president's law right now, the law of the land, makes it so that medicare, medicaid and social security all are on a road to insolvency. that's the current law. we believe that those three programs, medicaid, medicare and social security need to be saved and strengthened and secured. through our budget proposal we've had out the last two years we have put forward a proposal that actually makes it so that current retirees, current medicare recipients see no change whatsoever but in fact we save and secure the program for future generations. that the medicaid program which again is on a path to insolvency and states are complaining vociferously about this that we actually save that program from a financial standpoint. there are wonderful proposals on the table about solving and saving social security. you can't address the spending issues without fundamental really form and real solutions for medicare, medicaid and social security. >> brown: just to stay with you, won't those be unpopular? after this e
greece to actually change its laws so private creditors could no longer sue to collect if enough other creditors, like the e.c.b., also owned greek debt. could that serve as model for other countries? well, once you start changing laws, says hans humes, the sky's the limit. >> right now, we're teetering on something that's far worse than what we saw in latin america. >> reporter: in the 1980s or '90s you mean. >> yeah, i mean i lived in latin america, i saw it and i was part of the workout. this is worse. >> reporter: does lee buchheit then... >> have a lot of work? ( laughter ) >> reporter: yeah, i'm sure he has a lot of work, but does he bear a lot of the blame? >> no, no. i mean he's just reacting to the situation that's evolving. but i think there's a lot of concern that, if you have this legal coaching on how to really gut creditor rights, that you may actually end up in a situion ere nobodyantsto lend to countries. >> reporter: but if that's already a clear and present danger, we wondered why not just stiff the creditors? after all the history of sovereign debt is default, defaul
on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself, basically, until there's a constitution? >> well, he did a lot of little things. he dismissed the old prosecutor, seen as a hold-over from the old rejewel. he promised new trials. but the main thing that he did was to take all of his actions, and place them outside of court review. and he also made impossible to disband the constitutional assembly that is now writing the document. he had already assumed not simply presidential powers but legislative powers. that he did in august. what he is doing right now what, he
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)